The Invasion

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One of the greatest benefits of watching Doctor Who in chronological order is discovering hitherto unknown continuities. The Invasion was one of the first Patrick Troughton serials I watched.  Simple incidents, like the Doctor and his crew deciding to drop in on their old friend Professor Travers,  were lost on me.  Had I watched The Abominable Snowmen, and its sequel The Web of Fear prior to my first viewing of The Invasion then the significance would have been obvious. Similarly, that The Invasion was to some extent a remake of The Web of Fear would have been reasonably self-evident. The apparent absence of story arcs in Classic Series Doctor Who, and the presumption that all serials are entirely self contained, makes casual viewing of stories a joy.  Jumping between seasons and different Doctor’s tenures ensures the viewer of a diverse and eclectic range of material.  The handicap, however,  is the loss of character and series development.

This series' monsters, The Cybermen

This series’ monsters, The Cybermen

Defeated Cybermen

Defeated Cybermen

Seeing the evolution of characters that have been iconic is a real joy.  The Invasion is the story which introduces UNIT, the United Nations Intelligence Taskforce, to the world of Doctor Who. It is not, however, our first introduction to Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart.  Our first encounter with the then Colonel was in The Web of Fear where Lethbridge-Stewart was a suspicious unknown entity. Arriving in the embattled London Tube, as if out of nowhere, the Colonel  could well have been the feared Yeti collaborator.  A relationship of trust took some time to develop.  A  camaraderie from a past battle fought was evident when the Doctor and Jamie again met the promoted Brigadier in The Invasion.  It was four years since their last meeting, the Brigadier noted.  The character with which we become so familiar during the tenure of Jon Pertwee’s Doctor is not yet fully formed, though.   It will be some time before we encounter “classic” Brig moments like the eye-patched alter ego of Inferno or the “Chap with wings, there.  Five rounds rabid” of The Daemons. Although often experiencing difficulties with women, Lethbridge-Stewart was particularly Neanderthal in The Invasion, an issue that I will address when discussing the character of Isobel Watkins.

The Brigadier proudly informs the Doctor and Jamie that he's been promoted since last they met

The Brigadier proudly informs the Doctor and Jamie that he’s been promoted since last they met

It’s not often that I disagree with anything that Rob Shearman or Toby Hadoke say in their excellent marathon watch diary, Running Through Corridors.  It’s with Shearman, however , that I have issue with concerning the portrayal of Isobel Watkins who was played by Sally Faulkner.  Isobel is the niece of Professor Watkins, a professor of computer engineering and friend of the Professor Travers previously referred to.  Travers had decamped to the United States, letting his home to Watkins and Isobel during his absence. In his discussion of episode two I believe that Shearman is unfairly critical of the character.  He describes her variously as “a talentless pseud”, “friendless”, and a “selfish, utterly insane cow”.  Shearman doesn’t end there.  He’d sooner have lunch with the psychopath Tobias Vaughn than Isobel  who is the “sort of social misfit that will try to muscle her way into other people’s jokes”.  Shearman is then extraordinarily critical of Isobel’s feminist defence to Lethbridge-Stewart in episode five.  In his defence, Shearman believes that Isobel is a caricatured feminist, badly written by a male, who is made to look like an idiot.   That’s not how I see Isobel who is not unlike the former companion Polly.  A little akin to my squeals of delight at Maaga’s comments about men in Galaxy 4 (see my review for details), Isobel’s defence of women was one of those rare “stand up and cheer” moments.  It’s worth extracting it in full here.

Rob Shearman and Toby Hadoke, Running Through Corridors

Rob Shearman and Toby Hadoke, Running Through Corridors

Isobel takes shots of Zoe

Isobel takes shots of Zoe

BRIGADIER: And how do I prove that in the sewers of London there are creatures from outer space waiting to attack us.  Go and get one?

ZOE: You wouldn’t stand a chance against them, Isobel.

ISOBEL: Ah, you wouldn’t have to go anywhere near them.  Photograph them.

BRIGADIER: That’s not a bad idea.  Now, wait a minute, it’d be pitch dark down in those tunnels.

ISOBEL: You could use an infrared film, a twenty five filter on a thirty five mil camera with a telephoto lens, and why, you could take frame after frame without getting anywhere near them.

BRIGADIER: Is that all gibberish or do you really know what you’re talking about?

ISOBEL: Of course I know.

BRIGADIER: If you’re right, it could well be the sort of proof I need to get some action.

ISOBEL: Well, all I need is my cameras from the house and then I’m all set.

BRIGADIER: Well, you’re a young woman.  This is a job for my men.

ISOBEL: Well, of all the bigoted, anti-feminist, cretinous remarks.

BRIGADIER: This is no job for a girl like you.  Now that’s final.

ISOBEL: Oh, you, you, you man!

BRIGADIER: I’ll get in touch with my photographic unit and get them onto it.

ISOBEL: Oh, that stupid bigoted idiotic.

Isobel and Zoe in colour

Isobel and Zoe in colour

Zoe descends into the sewers to take photos of the Cybermen

Isobel descends into the sewers to take photos of the Cybermen

Zoe, who then stood up to Jamie when he expressed agreement with the Brig, was also afforded the opportunity in the serial to combat sexist assumptions.  To Jamie she said, “Just because you’re a man you think you’re superior, don’t you?”  To the automated answering machine at International Electromatics she gave an ALGOL problem which, being unable to be answered made the machine blow up. Zoe finally calculated complex missile trajectories in her head which facilitated the programming of the Russian missiles and the destruction of the Cybermen’s mother ship.  The UNIT soldiers thought that she could be kept on as she’s “much prettier than a computer”. Who dared say that girls know nothing about computers and maths!

The Invasion - just because you're a man

Zoe takes great delight in blowing up an automated answering machine

Zoe takes great delight in blowing up an automated answering machine

The Doctor and Jamie have some wonderful physical comedy moments in The Invasion.  A fast walk away from the mysterious UNIT undercover agents quickly turns into a run. When eventually they’re cornered in a lane, with a wry smile the Doctor sits down in the gutter and produces a pack of cards which he shuffles whilst awaiting their imminent capture. Jamie gets in the rear driver’s side door of a Jaguar, slides across to the passenger side door, disembarks and then hops in the front passenger seat.  The Doctor does some wonderfully comic running and jumping whilst evading bullets and grenades on two occasions.  All of these are done silently and are just superb.

The Doctor protects his hearing as he runs from a Cyberman

The Doctor protects his hearing as he runs from a Cyberman

The Invasion has arguably the most iconic of all Doctor Who images, the Cybermen emerging from the sewers and descending, on mass, the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral.  The phenomenal cliff hanger to episode six has rightly taken its place in history. The only cliff hanger to compare, in my humble opinion, is the Dalek emerging from the polluted waters of the River Thames in episode one of The Dalek Invasion of Earth.

Perhaps the most iconic cliff hanger in classic series Doctor Who.  The Cybermen on the steps of St Paul's Cathedral

Perhaps the most iconic cliff hanger in classic series Doctor Who. The Cybermen on the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral

There are parallels between the Series Two episodes, Rise of the Cybermen and The Age of Steel, and this 1968 Cybermen tale.  The name given to the Cybus Industries front company which collects the homeless for upgrading, International Electromatics, is identical to Tobias Vaughn’s conglomerate in The Invasion. Humans are controlled by Ear Pods in the first 21st Century Cybermen tale, whilst in 1968 it was a microchip in IE produced electronics goods, such as disposable transistor radios, that put humans into a deep sleep.

In the 2006 episodes, Rise of the Cybermen and The Age of Steel, the Cybermen controlled humans through Ear Pods.  Pictured here are Rose Tyler's parents, Jackie and Pete

In the 2006 episodes, Rise of the Cybermen and The Age of Steel, the Cybermen controlled humans through Ear Pods. Pictured here are Rose Tyler’s parents, Jackie and Pete

Director Douglas Camfield made a gifted choice in casting Kevin Stoney as the partly cyber converted head of International Electromatics, Tobias Vaughn.  Stoney, as you may recall, portrayed Mavic Chen in the Season Three epic, The Daleks’ Master Plan.  The characters of Chen and Vaughn are in many respects quite similar.  In both instances a human (or humanoid) seeks the ultimate power of world (or solar system) domination and in doing so enters into an uneasy alliance with monstrous aliens.  Both characters are under the unfortunate misapprehension that they can successfully betray their allies at an appropriate juncture, however Chen and Vaughn are both disposed of once they have served their purpose. Stoney was a sublimely brilliant actor who created what were arguably the two greatest villains of Classic Series Who.

Kevin Stoney played the role of Tobias Vaughn

Kevin Stoney played the role of Tobias Vaughn

The Doctor and Vaughn shortly before Vaughn's death

The Doctor and Vaughn shortly before Vaughn’s death

Although five years into Doctor Who’s history, there are still some firsts in The Invasion. Notwithstanding being a Science Fiction series, it is not until this story that we hear reference to a UFO.  It’s also the first time that we see the Doctor drive, albeit briefly.  That’s something that we will all become very accustomed to during the Third Doctor’s tenure.  John Levene also makes his first appearance as the then Corporal Benton, although he had previously appeared inside monster’s suits.  In The Moonbase  he was uncredited as a Cyberman, and in The Web of Fear he was a Yeti.

John Levene appears for the first time as the then Corporal Benton

John Levene appears for the first time as the then Corporal Benton

Episodes one and four were animated by Cosgrove Hall superbly.  Having recently watched the animations in The Reign of Terror and The Ice Warriors, both of which were undertaken by different teams, I can unreservedly say that The Invasion’s is by far the superior. The sense of light and shade, and the landscapes, were particularly agreeable. That being said, once The Tenth Planet is released I may well view all the animations again.  I suspect that watching them one after another will give me a greater appreciation of each of the respective animators’ strengths and weaknesses.

The Doctor and Jamie leave Vaughn's office in an animated episode

The Doctor and Jamie leave Vaughn’s office in an animated episode

Cybermen Ambush, The Invasion (1968)

Join me for my next review as I examine Robert Holmes’ debut story, The Krotons. 

The Invasion was originally broadcast in the UK between 2 November and 21 December 1968

The Invasion was originally broadcast in the UK between 2 November and 21 December 1968

Vivien Fleming

©Vivien Fleming, 2013.

REFERENCE:

Robert Shearman & Toby Hadoke, Running Through Corridors. Rob & Toby’s Marathon Watch of Doctor Who. Volume 1: The 60s, Mad Norweigan Press: Illinois, 2010.

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13 responses »

  1. wow… I have new found appreciation for your well written and thought out articles about each of the shows as you watch them now (considering the comments from Running Through Corridors). I enjoy how you tie the shows together both with previous shows as well as future shows. I think it would be fun watching them with you 🙂 Our marathon here just concluded the classic series with survival last night… Next we watch the Who movie then venture into the Doctor Who reboot shows 🙂

    • Thanks for your kind words. There’s actually more I could have added to my comments about Rob Shearman’s view of Isobel however I was keen to get to bed 🙂 After saying that Isobel’s comments about feminism to the Brig were “so irritating that it makes my teeth smart”, he then condemned the fact that Isobel was chatting up the soldier and complaining that he wasn’t stinking rich. His response was “the programme can’t have it both ways”. Well, women can have it both ways. One of the most irritating stereotypes about women’s liberation is that women who support it are man haters. 99% don’t hate men and have every right to chat up a man – unless of course it amounts to harassment!

      Good luck watching the Who movie! Whilst it’s far from one of my favourites I won’t condemn it. It just makes me happy that the rest of Doctor Who is British made 🙂

      • Hmmm … we watched the Who movie tonite. It was pretty good as a movie … pretty bad as a Doctor Who show. We gave it a C+ grade. Then we kept going and watched Rose to see if the “real” Doctor Who feeling would be back again – and YES – gave Rose an A+ grade! The Who movie seemed to just disregard many aspects of Who that were painstakingly built up over 25 years and 155 shows! They made the Doctor half human even! The theme music was pretty mangled and they even went so far as to declare Greenwich Mean Time as being replaced with San Francisco Mean Time (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenwich_Mean_Time for how time really IS centered in England … perfect for Doctor Who as a Time Lord). I will stop these comments now (after all, this article is The Invasion). I will patiently wait till you get to the Who Movie to read your insights on it!

  2. you can delete this after reading it… up till now your site has been perfect… but I think I finally found a mistake 🙂

    the caption under the descent into the sewers to take photos says it is Zoe… but the photo is not of her … it is Isobel

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