Monthly Archives: October 2013

Enemy of the World Region 4 DVD Release 27 November

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ImageThe recently recovered missing serial The Enemy of the World is set for DVD release in Australia and New Zealand on 27 November 2013. Although both The Enemy of the World and The Web of Fear were released on iTunes Australia on 11 October, neither of the serials are available on iTunes in New Zealand.  Like Australia, New Zealand has purchased and aired Doctor Who since the very first story, An Unearthly Child, almost 50 years ago.  The BBC’s snub of New Zealand fans is deplorable. As The Web of Fear is not due for DVD release until sometime in the new year, New Zealanders still have a long wait to see the Brigadier’s debut. 

Details on what, if any, special features are included in The Enemy of the World have yet to be released.  The latest issue of the Doctor Who Magazine states that “Enemy is due to be released on DVD in November, along with special features yet to be confirmed”. The British Board of Film Classification appears not to have approved any special features to date. A basic release without special features has become known in fandom as a “vanilla” release.

The current edition of the Doctor Who Magazine with The Enemy of the World Cover.  This edition of DWM is also available with a special edition cover featuring The Web of Fear

The current edition of the Doctor Who Magazine with The Enemy of the World cover. This edition of DWM is also available with a special edition cover featuring The Web of Fear

Enemy is currently available for pre-order at both the BBC Doctor Who online store and the ABC Shop for $19.95.  As both retailers ordinarily sell new release Doctor Who classic series DVDs for $29.95 one wonders if the discounted price reflects a “vanilla” release. Alternatively, the reduced price may be based upon the assumption that purchasers have previously bought the release for $14.99 on iTunes.  Only time will tell!

A Radio Times produced retro poster for The Enemy of the World

A Radio Times produced retro poster for The Enemy of the World

Vivien Fleming

©Vivien Fleming, 2013.

Day 36 of 50th Anniversary Countdown – The First Doctor’s Accessories

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Yesterday the Doctor Who Mind Robber looked at the Second Doctor’s peculiar penchant for hats.  Today we examine the First Doctor’s accessories.  By accessories we refer to anything worn or used by the Doctor to compliment his clothing or to assist in his business  as a time-travelling hero.  The First Doctor is perhaps best known for his blue signet ring, pictured above. Together with being decorative the ring also had special powers. Amongst other things it controlled a Zarbi and opened the main doors of the TARDIS in The Web Planet; unjammed the TARDIS’s locking mechanism in The Daleks’ Master Plan; and hypnotised Dodo in The War Machines. In the days prior to the sonic screwdriver, which was introduced in the Second Doctor’s tenure, the First Doctor’s signet ring worked magic.

1. An Unearthly Child

The First Doctor first appeared in eccentric garb with a cape, long scarf and fez type hat

The First Doctor first appeared in eccentric garb with a cape, long scarf and fez type hat

The Doctor's cape is seen more clearly here in the first episode of An Unearthly Child.  This scene has been recreated for An Adventure in Space and Time

The Doctor’s cape is seen more clearly here in the first episode of An Unearthly Child. This scene has been recreated for An Adventure in Space and Time

The recreated scene in An Adventure in Space and Time

The recreated scene in An Adventure in Space and Time

For the first and only time  the Doctor is seen to smoke in An Unearthly Child.  Patrick Troughton was seen smoking a cigar in The Enemy of the World but was playing the Doctor's evil double, Salamadar, at the time.

For the first and only time in Doctor Who’s history that the Doctor is seen to smoke is in An Unearthly Child. Patrick Troughton was seen smoking a cigar in The Enemy of the World but was playing the Doctor’s evil double, Salamader, at the time.

2. The Edge of Destruction

In The Edge of Destruction the Doctor wore a bandage which changed colour as the wound healed

In The Edge of Destruction the Doctor wore a bandage which changed colour as the wound healed

3. The Aztecs

The Doctor carried a cane on many occasions.  He is pictured here with his love interest from The Aztecs, Cameca

The Doctor carried a cane on many occasions. He is pictured here with his love interest from The Aztecs, Cameca

4. The Reign of Terror

In The Reign of Terror the Doctor masqueraded as District Commissioner, resplendent in a large and colourful feathered hat

In The Reign of Terror the Doctor masqueraded as District Commissioner, resplendent in a large and colourful feathered hat

5. Planet of Giants

The Doctor wore a decorative gold chain with his cape in Planet of Giants

The Doctor wore a decorative gold chain with his cape in Planet of Giants

6. The Romans

The Doctor carried, and pretended to play a lyre as he masqueraded as Maximus Pettulian

The Doctor carried and pretended to play a lyre as he masqueraded as Maximus Pettulian in The Romans

7. The Web Planet

The Zarbi used these unusual collars to control the Doctor and Vicki in The Web Planet

The Zarbi used these unusual collars to control the Doctor and Vicki in The Web Planet. The Doctor later referred to them as necklaces

8. The Space Museum

In The Space Museum the Doctor used the top opening of a Dalek casing almost like a hat

In The Space Museum the Doctor used the top opening of a Dalek casing almost like a hat

9. The Time Meddler

The Doctor tells Vicki and Steven that the item he is holding is not a "space helmet for a cow" in The Time Meddler

The Doctor tells Vicki and Steven that the item he is holding is not a “space helmet for a cow” in The Time Meddler

10. The Daleks’ Master Plan

The Doctor wore a stylish panama hat in The Daleks' Master Plan

The Doctor wore a stylish panama hat in The Daleks’ Master Plan

A side view of the hat as the Doctor chats with Steven and the short lived companion Sara Kingdom

A side view of the hat as the Doctor chats with Steven and the short lived companion Sara Kingdom

11. The Massacre

In The Massacre the Doctor wore a tall hat, not altogether dissimilar to that which the Second Doctor would become known for

In The Massacre the Doctor wore a tall hat, not altogether dissimilar to that which the Second Doctor would become known for.  The Doctor is also seen to wear a decorative gold chain on his cape and a cane

12. The Gunfighters

The Doctor wore a western style black hat in The Gunfighters

The Doctor wore a western style black hat in The Gunfighters

13. The Savages

The Doctor carried a Reacting Vibrator in The Savages

The Doctor carried a Reacting Vibrator in The Savages

14. The War Machines

The Doctor wore a black fez in The War Machines

The Doctor wore a black fez in The War Machines

Vivien Fleming

Day 37 of 50th Anniversary Countdown – The Second Doctor’s Hats

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When the Second Doctor burst forth onto our television screens it appeared  for short time that Doctor Who may have acquired a rather eccentric hat fancier as its new Doctor. Decked out in a battered stove pipe hat, the Doctor was quick to remark upon hats he found enticing.  In his premiere serial, The Power of the Daleks, the Doctor complimented Bragen on his hat which he found very smart.  “I would like a hat like that” he told the Bragen, Vulcan’s Head of Security and rebel leader.

The Doctor wears his stove pipe hat whilst reading his 500 Year Diary in The Power of the Daleks

The Doctor wears his stove pipe hat whilst reading his 500 Year Diary in The Power of the Daleks

In his next adventure, The Highlanders, the Doctor quickly spotted a bonnet with eagle feather and Jacobite cockade. Putting the hat on the Doctor said to Polly, “I would like a hat like that.  How do I look?”  Polly replied, “It’s got words on it.  With Charles our brave and merciful Prince Royal, we’ll greatly fall or nobly save our country”.  The Doctor’s response was “Bah, Romantic piffle”.  He then threw the bonnet onto the ground.

The Doctor again spoke of his desire for others’ hats in episode four of The Highlanders. When Ben pulled a tam-o’shanter over his face the Doctor responded for the third time in his short tenure with the phrase, “I would like a hat like that”.

A collection of tam-o'shanters.  There are very few still photos, and no film whatsoever, for the Doctor's second adventure, The Highlanders

A collection of tam-o’shanters. There are very few still photos, and no film whatsoever, of the Doctor’s second adventure, The Highlanders

Alas, the Doctor’s obsession with envying others’ hats ended in The Highlanders. His own penchant for wearing hats similarly dissipated as his stove pipe hat was quickly relegated to the TARDIS’s chest. He donned hats from time to time thereafter, but never again would he have signature headwear.  His recorder would be seen a little longer, however it too would soon find itself gathering dust somewhere within the realms of the TARDIS.

The Doctor's recorder lasted just a little longer than his signature stove pipe hat of early serials

The Doctor’s recorder lasted just a little longer than his signature stove pipe hat of early serials

In the tradition of Monty Python’s The Life of Brian, we will take a liberal interpretation of the word “hat”.  If it was good enough for Python not to take “Blessed are the cheesemakers” literally, and to accept that “it refers to any manufacturers of dairy products”, then it’s good enough for The Doctor Who Mind Robber. “Hat” will therefore refer to any headpiece or item of any nature whatsoever which was placed upon the Doctor’s head.  Join The Doctor Who Mind Robber as we investigate the Second Doctor’s fascination with headwear. To chart the evolution of the Doctor’s headwear all serials are listed in broadcast order.

A publicity shot of Patrick Troughton wearing his trademark stove pipe hat and playing a recorder

A publicity shot of Patrick Troughton wearing his trademark stove pipe hat and playing a recorder

1. The Power of the Daleks

The Second Doctor wears a stove pipe hat in his first serial, The Power of the Daleks

The Second Doctor wears a stove pipe hat in his first serial, The Power of the Daleks

The Doctor, Ben and a Dalek in The Power of the Daleks

The Doctor, Ben and a Dalek in The Power of the Daleks

2. The Highlanders

Ben, The Doctor, Polly and THAT hat in The Highlanders

Ben, The Doctor, Polly and THAT hat in The Highlanders

The Doctor briefly wore a Jacobite bonnet before dismissing it as "Romantic piffle"

The Doctor briefly wore a Jacobite bonnet before dismissing it as “Romantic piffle”

Disguising himself as a women, the Doctor wears a head scarf in The Highlanders

Disguising himself as a women, the Doctor wears a head scarf in The Highlanders

3. The Underwater Menace

The Doctor wears an unusual form of headwear in The Underwater Menace

The Doctor wears an unusual form of headwear in The Underwater Menace

Continuing his tradition for dressing up, the Doctor dons a hippy type bandanna and dark glasses in The Underwater Menace

Continuing his tradition for dressing up, the Doctor dons a hippy type bandanna and dark glasses in The Underwater Menace

4. The Macra Terror

The Doctor in a drum majorette's hat in The Macra Terror

The Doctor in a drum majorette’s hat in The Macra Terror

5. Fury From the Deep

The Doctor kept his head warm down by the beach in Fury From the Deep

The Doctor kept his head warm down by the beach in Fury From the Deep

6. The Wheel in Space

The Doctor wears a strange contraption on his head in The Wheel in Space

The Doctor wears a strange contraption on his head in The Wheel in Space

7. The Mind Robber

The Master of the Land of Fiction hooked the Doctor up to the computer in The Mind Robber

The Master of the Land of Fiction hooked the Doctor up to the computer in The Mind Robber

8. The Krotons

The Doctor takes the test in The Krotons

The Doctor takes the test in The Krotons

9. The Seeds of Death

The Doctor is caught in so much foam that it even covers his head in The Seeds of Death

The Doctor is caught in so much foam that it even covers his head in The Seeds of Death

10. The War Games

The Doctor and Zoe wear Army caps in The War Games

The Doctor and Zoe wear Army caps in The War Games

Vivien Fleming

©Vivien Fleming, 2013.

Deconstructing the 50 Years’ Trailer – Fan Reaction

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The Doctor Who 50th Anniversary trailer was aired on BBC One on Saturday night and released online immediately after. Fan reaction has been overwhelmingly positive. Notwithstanding the BBC’s statement that the “trailer does not include any actual footage of the 50th anniversary episode”, fans have nonetheless dissected and deconstructed the trailer for any hints to The Day of the Doctor’s content. 

A number of enlightening articles have been posted by fellow bloggers. Particularly commendable are Blogtor Who’s image breakdown of the trailer which includes 27 screen captures and their article on 50 things to notice. Also of note are Doctor Who TV’s11 Things we Loved in the Doctor Who 50 Year Trailer” and their “50th Anniversary Trailer Who Did You Miss?”  Also check out io9’s “24 Things you Missed from Doctor Who’s 50th Anniversary Trailer”. Enjoy deconstructing the Trailer!

A scene from the 50 Years' Trailer.  Is this this the Brigadier?

A scene from the 50 Years’ Trailer. Is this the Brigadier?

Vivien Fleming

Behind the Scenes of Doctor Who 50 Years’ Trailer – Photo Gallery

Gallery

An Adventure in Time and Space – Photo Gallery

Gallery

Missing Episodes – Has Marco Polo Been Recovered?

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In an article published in the Radio Times the writer of An Adventure in Space and Time, Mark Gatiss, has indicated that “moments of lost episodes ,.. like Marco Polo” have been recreated for the drama. The 90 minute production, which dramatizes the origins of Doctor Who, will be aired in November as part of the 50th Anniversary celebrations. Stars of the show include David Bradley as William Hartnell (the First Doctor), Brian Cox as Sydney Newman (Doctor Who co-creator), and Jessica Raine as Verity Lambert (first producer). The two surviving members of the original cast of Doctor Who, William Russell (Ian Chesterton) and Carole Ann Ford (Susan Foreman) appear in small cameo roles as “Harry” and “Joyce”. Mark Eden, who played Marco Polo in the missing serial of the same name, appears in the drama as Donald Baverstock, the Controller of BBC One.

Mark Eden as Marco Polo. Pictured behind him is William Russell as Ian Chesterton.  Both Eden and Russell appear in An Adventure in Space and Time

Mark Eden as Marco Polo. Pictured behind him is William Russell as Ian Chesterton. Both Eden and Russell appear in An Adventure in Space and Time

Rumours circulating prior to the announced recovery of The Enemy of the World and The Web of Fear earlier this month speculated that Marco Polo was part of a three serial haul. So consistent were the rumours that an acronym circulated amongst fans for this alleged multiple story recovery – MEW (Marco, Enemy, Web). 

In our article on 21 October The Doctor Who Mind Robber mused upon the relationship between the revival of the Great Intelligence in Series 7 and the recovery of The Web of Fear, the second (and last) story in which the Intelligence appeared. In our humble opinion it appears that Doctor Who show runner, Steven Moffat, was aware of Web’s recovery and almost certainly resurrected the Intelligence to assist in the BBC’s marketing of the recovered episodes.

The Eleventh Doctor )(Matt Smith) with the Great Intelligence (Richard E. Grant) in The Name of the Doctor

The Eleventh Doctor (Matt Smith) with the Great Intelligence (Richard E. Grant) in The Name of the Doctor

Given the precedent set by the Intelligence’s return, together with the long-standing MEW rumours, it’s at least arguable that Gattis’ recreation of elements of Marco Polo is a further example of a BBC missing episode marketing campaign. Should we anticipate an announcement on the return of Marco Polo not long after the broadcast of An Adventure in Space and Time? Let’s wait and see!

In the meantime, check out our gallery of brilliant promotional photographs for An Adventure in Time and Space here.

Radio Times produced retro poster for The Web of Fear

Radio Times produced retro poster for The Web of Fear

Vivien Fleming

©Vivien Fleming, 2013.

Day 38 of 50th Anniversary Countdown – 10 Great Companion Outfits of the Sixties

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In no particular order The Doctor Who Mind Robber today presents 10 Great Companion Outfits of the Sixties.

1. Jamie McCrimmon –  Kilt

Possessed of a fine pair of legs, Jamie McCrimmon always looked stunning in his kilt

Possessed of a fine pair of legs, Jamie McCrimmon always looked stunning in his kilt

2. Zoe Heriot – Catsuit

Zoe fights the Karkus in her famous catsuit

Zoe fights the Karkus in her famous catsuit

3. Barbara Wright – Yetaxa

Barbara masqueraded as the reincarnated priest Yetaxa in The Aztecs

Barbara masqueraded as the reincarnated priest Yetaxa in The Aztecs

4. Dodo Chaplet – The Celestial Toymaker

Zoe looked fabulous in The Celestial Toymaker

Zoe looked fabulous in The Celestial Toymaker

5. Sara Kingdom – The Daleks’ Master Plan

Jean Marsh in black cat suit as Sara Kingdom

Jean Marsh in black catsuit as Sara Kingdom

6. Zoe Heriot – Space Pirates’ Hotpants

Zoe shows some leg in The Space Pirates

Zoe shows some leg in The Space Pirates

7. Susan – An Unearthly Child

Susan at her casual best in An Unearthly Child

Susan at her casual best in An Unearthly Child

8. Polly – Way Out Sixties

Is this the ultimate Sixties companion outfit?

Is this the ultimate Sixties companion outfit?

9. Victoria – The Abominable Snowmen

Victoria emerges from the TARDIS and is shocked by what she sees

Victoria wears Victorian riding gear in The Abominable Snowmen

10. Zoe Heriot – The Invasion 

Zoe in a green feather boa in The Invasion

Zoe in a green feather boa in The Invasion

 

HONOURABLE MENTION

Polly dresses as a local in The Underwater Menace

Polly dresses as a local in The Underwater Menace

 

Vivien Fleming

Day 39 of 50th Anniversary Countdown – The 5 Greatest Monsters of the Sixties

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Doctor Who’s long history of non-human villains has its genesis in the show’s second ever serial, The Daleks. Choosing the Top 5 is relatively easy given the extraordinarily high attrition rate of monsters considered to be “the next big thing”. Starting with Terry Nation’s The Sensorites, and ending with Robert Homes’ The Krotons, the Sixties were littered with the carcases of monsters that never quite made the grade.  The Dominator’s Quarks, The Underwater Menace’s benevolent Fish People, The Macra Terror’s Macra, The War Machines’ WOTAN and War Machines, Galaxy 4’s Rill, The Chase’s Mechonoids, and The Web Planet’s Zarbi and Menoptra are but a few  examples.

One of the less successful monsters of the Sixties, the Fish People from The Underwater Menace

One of the less successful monsters of the Sixties, the Fish People from The Underwater Menace

In essence, any 1960s monster that scored a repeat story in that decade has made The Doctor Who Mind Robber’s list of the Greatest Monsters of the Sixties. All have been revived in New Series Doctor Who, with the exception of the Yeti. Please see Day 49 of our countdown for the Ten Least Remembered Monsters of the Sixties.

5. The Great IntelligenceThe Abominable Snowmen and The Web of Fear

When Colonel Lethbridge-Stewart asked the Doctor in The Web of Fear what the Great Intelligence was he responded by saying, “Well, I wish I could give you a precise answer.  Perhaps the best way to describe it is a sort of formless, shapeless thing floating around in space like a cloud of mist, only with a mind and will”.

The Doctor, Jamie and Victoria first encountered the Great Intelligence at the Det-Sen monastery in 1935 Tibet (The Abominable Snowmen).  Having possessed the body of the monastery’s Master, Padmasambhava, this otherwise disembodied sentient being permitted its host to live up to 300 years.  The Intelligence forced Padmasambhava to build him an army of robot Yeti, the construction of which took over 200 years.  The Yeti were controlled by small hand-made pyramids. The Intelligence’s plans to take over the mountain on which the monastery stood were thwarted when the Doctor, Edward Travers and the companions destroyed the pyramids. Padmasambhava finally found the peace he so desired when his body passed away and the Intelligence again became a sentient being without a parasitic body.

The Abominable Snowmen's Padmasambhava was possessed by the Great Intelligence

The Abominable Snowmen’s Padmasambhava was possessed by the Great Intelligence

The Doctor and his companions again met the Intelligence when they found themselves in the London Underground 40 years later. In The Web of Fear their old friend Professor Travis had inadvertently facilitated the reactivation of the Yeti. The Doctor, Jamie and Victoria teamed up with members of the British Army to thwart the Intelligence’s plans for domination. The Intelligence used the body of the deceased Staff Sergeant Arnold and even Professor Travers for a short time.  The Intelligence sought to possess the Doctor’s body and to drain his mind with a conversion headset.  Unbeknownst to his companions, the Doctor had already reversed the settings so that it was the Intelligence’s mind, rather than his own, that would be drained.  Jamie, however, smashed the control spheres prior to the Doctor sapping the Intelligence’s mind.  Although still alive, the Intelligence vanished and was never again seen by the Second Doctor.

Staff Sergeant Arnold was possessed by the Great Intelligence in The Web of Fear

Staff Sergeant Arnold was possessed by the Great Intelligence in The Web of Fear

4. The YetiThe Abominable Snowmen and The Web of Fear

Although briefly seen in the 20th Anniversary Special, The Five Doctors, the Yeti have only been the central players of two serials, The Abominable Snowmen and The Web of Fear. Robotic servants of the Great Intelligence, the first Yeti were manufactured by Padmasambhava at the Intelligence’s command.  Rather pear shaped and cuddly, the Mark 1 Yeti were not as threatening in appearance as their Mark 2 counterparts which had claws capable of holding web-guns and were more streamlined. Exactly who assisted the Intelligence in the production of the Mark 2 Yeti of The Web of Fear has never revealed.

The Doctor and a Yeti in The Web of Fear

The Doctor and a Yeti in The Web of Fear

3. The Ice WarriorsThe Ice Warriors and  The Seeds of Death

The Ice Warriors are natives of the planet Mars. Large reptilian humanoids, the Ice Warriors can stand up to 7 feet in height. The Doctor and his companions first came upon the Ice Warriors at the Brittanicus Base where they had been frozen in ice for over 5,000 years. Defeated when their space craft exploded the Ice Warriors were next encountered on the Moon in The Seeds of Death. Their attempts at obtaining control of the Earth were foiled when the Doctor discovered that their seed pods were ruined by water.  The Doctor then sent their space craft into an orbit around the sun.

The Doctor used his genius in an attempt to thwart death in The Seeds of Death

The Doctor used his genius in an attempt to thwart death in The Seeds of Death

When the Ice Warriors were next met by the Doctor in 1972’s The Curse of Peladon they were members of the Galactic Foundation and had renounced violence. They became allies with the Doctor and remained so in a subsequent Third Doctor adventure, The Monster of Peladon (1974). In 2013’s Cold War the Ice Warriors’ pacifism was a long forgotten.  

Pertwee era Ice Warriors

Pertwee era Ice Warriors

2. The CybermenThe Tenth Planet, The Moonbase, The Tomb of the Cybermen, The Wheel in Space and The Invasion.

The Cybermen made their Doctor Who debut in William Hartnell’s last serial, The Tenth Planet. Very much humanoid in appearance, the Mark 1 Cybermen were possessed of a sing-song voice.  Their faces were covered only with a stocking and they still retained their human hands. Unlike their successors, the first Cybermen initially did not seek to destroy the human race but rather hoped to convince them to join their “utopian” existence.

A Mark 1 Cyberman in The Tenth Planet

A Mark 1 Cyberman in The Tenth Planet

With the success of their first television appearance the Cybermen were quickly co-opted as rivals to the Dalek’s mantle of favourite Doctor Who monster. Each story in which they appeared saw their costumes modified, with the most substantial change occurring to the Mark 2 model.  Gone were the stockinged faces and in their place were robotic heads.  The five digits of their human hands were replaced by three fingered gloved hands.

The Cybermen emerge from their icy tombs in this iconic image from The Tomb of the Cybermen

The Cybermen emerge from their icy tombs in this iconic image from The Tomb of the Cybermen

The Cybermen were the subject of two particularly iconic images of Sixties Who.  Even the tackiness of breaking through new-fangled cling wrap was insufficient to dampen the effectiveness of the Cybermen’s emergence from their icy tombs in The Tomb of the Cybermen.  Their appearance on, and march down, the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral in The Invasion was arguably the greatest cliff hanger of the era. Still images of the event have become part of popular culture.

Perhaps the most iconic cliff hanger in classic series Doctor Who.  The Cybermen on the steps of St Paul's Cathedral

Perhaps the most iconic cliff hanger in classic series Doctor Who. The Cybermen on the steps of St Paul’s Cathedral in The Invasion

1.   The DaleksThe Daleks, The Dalek Invasion of Earth, The Space Museum (cameo), The Chase, Mission to the Unknown, The Daleks’ Master Plan, The Power of the Daleks and The Evil of the Daleks

Only a brave person would nominate anything other than the Daleks as their favourite 1960s monsters. Appearing in just the second Doctor Who serial, it was arguably the Daleks that saved the show from a mere 13 week run. In a stroke of genius the Terry Nation created and Ray Cusick designed mutants immediately captured the imagination of the British public. Dalekmania was in full swing and within 18 months the Daleks would appear in the first of two colour, theatrically released movies.

Barbara is pinned against the wall in fear during the Daleks' first appearance in Doctor Who on 21st December 1963

Barbara is pinned against the wall in fear during the Daleks’ first appearance in Doctor Who on 21st December 1963

The Daleks featured in seven Sixties serials and appeared as a cameo in another. The 12 piece extravaganza The Daleks’ Master Plan is one of the most sought after missing serials. Only 3 episodes are held in the BBC Archives.  Among other missing episodes is Mission to the Unknown, the only one part 1960s serial which also has the distinction of featuring none of the regular cast.  Arguably the most missed of all Dalek serials is the Second Doctor’s first story, The Power of the Daleks.  It, together with another missing story, The Evil of the Daleks, is highly revered in fandom.  It can only be hoped that at least some of these missing episodes are some day recovered.

The 12 part Dalek's Master Plan is one of the most sought after missing Doctor Who serials

The 12 part The Dalek’s Master Plan is one of the most sought after missing Doctor Who serials

HONOURABLE MENTION

The Chumblies – Galaxy 4

Although the Chumblies were never reprised they were the most adorable Doctor Who monsters ever.  Despite the Doctor, Steven and Vicki being initially frightened by them it soon became apparent that they were benign and worked for the good and just with the Rill. The Chumblies are top of my list of Sixties monsters that I’d most like to see revived.

A Chumbley with the Drahvins in Galaxy 4

A Chumbley with the Drahvins in Galaxy 4

Vivien Fleming

©Vivien Fleming, 2013.

Missing Episodes – Let’s Discuss Coincidences

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In my review of the recently released The Ice Warriors DVD on 3 September I posited that there may be a relationship between the resurrection of seemingly deceased Doctor Who monsters and the sale of Classic Series DVDs. Only four months prior to The Ice Warrior’s DVD release an Ice Warrior emerged for the first time in 39 years in The Cold War. Similarly, the last Fourth Doctor DVD to be issued, The Terror of the Zygons, coincidently found its way onto retailers’ shelves but a mere six weeks prior to the Zygons much anticipated reprise in the 50th Anniversary Special, The Day of the Doctor. Should we anticipate the return of the Fish People soon given the impending release of The Underwater Menace, I asked.

The Ice Warriors DVD Cover

In retrospect, the recovery of The Web of Fear is now obvious considering the story arc which commenced with the 2012 Christmas Special, The Snowmen.  At the time the return of the Great Intelligence, a formless mass first encountered in The Abominable Snowmen and last seen in The Web of Fear 44 years earlier, was a incredibly bizarre decision by Doctor Who show runner Steven Moffat. Of all villains to resurrect, why choose one who only appeared in two missing serials over 40 years previously? Not that this was the first time that a monster seemingly lost for all time had been reimaged.  The Macra reappeared in the 2007 Series 3 episode Gridlock having last been seen in 1967’s The Macra Terror.

A snowman from 2012's The Snowmen

A snowman from 2012’s The Snowmen

The Great Intelligence’s revival was not limited to a single episode, however.  It went on to appear in two further Series 7 episodes, The Bells of Saint John and The Name of the Doctor and was the series’ major protagonist.  Which leads us to further coincidences.  Were the Snowmen who accompanied the Great Intelligence in The  Snowmen a substitute for the Intelligence’s first tools, the Yeti? Should we anticipate the recovery and issue of The Abominable Snowmen sometime soon? Moreover, is this image taken from the 50th Anniversary trailer perhaps a hint that The Abominable Snowmen has indeed been returned.  The snow capped mountains in the background clearly represent Tibet and the stone block building could readily be a monastery.  Is the Second Doctor playing his recorder as if to summon the missing episodes home? Only time will tell, however one thing is certain.  Henceforth the revival of any monsters and villains from lost 1960’s episodes  will be scrutinized and speculated upon by fans as evidence of recoveries.  Let’s see what the 50th Anniversary and Christmas Specials, together with Series 8, brings forth!

A screen capture from the BBC trailer for the 50th Anniversary Special, The Name of the Doctor

A screen capture from the BBC trailer for the 50th Anniversary Special, The Day of the Doctor

Vivien Fleming

©Vivien Fleming, 2013.